Factors Affecting Driving While Suspended


Cover Page

Technical Report

Technical Summary

Acknowledgements

List of Tables

Introduction

Study Sites

Observational Study

Focus Group Research

Conclusions

References

 

 


As noted above, there were noticeable differences between the characteristics of the subjects at the two sites, as well as differences among subjects within each site. A few variables were examined for their within-site effects on whether an offender drove while suspended.

In general, the small number of cases in each site limited the ability to identify statistically significant relationships. Thus, the patterns described below must be regarded only as suggestive of a relationship. Based on the median annual household income associated with the offender's zip code, income level did not appear to be a factor in whether Bergen County offenders drove during their suspension. Among all Milwaukee subjects, the prevalence of driving during the suspension period was higher among subjects living in areas with median annual incomes less than $25,000 (73 percent vs. 45 percent). With regard to gender effects on driving while suspended, 3 of the 6 female Milwaukee subjects drove during at least one of the during-suspension observations; the other 3 were not observed traveling. Nine of the 36 Bergen County offenders were female; the female subjects were less likely than male subjects to be observed traveling (44 percent vs. 70 percent), and also less likely to drive when traveling (25 percent versus 37 percent). In Bergen County, 21-25 year-old offenders were less likely than other offenders to drive when traveling (14 percent vs. 44 percent). However, this was not the case among Milwaukee offenders.

Although only 6 Bergen County subjects had had a prior license suspension, these offenders were less likely than other subjects to drive while suspended (20 percent vs. 39 percent, based on subjects who were observed traveling). In Milwaukee, however, 67 percent of subjects had had a prior license suspension, and these subjects were more likely than other subjects to drive while suspended (82 percent vs. 62 percent, based on subjects who were observed traveling). Almost half the Milwaukee subjects were already serving a license suspension when arrested for DWI, and these subjects were much more likely than other subjects to drive while suspended (81 percent vs. 68 percent, based on subjects who were observed traveling).